About

I’m a professor of history at Laurentian University: I teach and research in English and European history as well as writing on pop culture and history topics. I have a Ph.D. and an M.A. in History from the University of Toronto. I took my B.A. in European History at Purdue University.

Forthcoming:
I will contribute a chapter on mothers to Game of Thrones Versus History edited by Brian A. Pavlac for Wiley in 2016. I have two article drafts in the works on women and the early modern English legal system.

In Print:
Cover for The Hobbit and history My co-edited collection, The Hobbit and History in Wiley’s “Pop Culture and History” series, came out in November, 2014. I also wrote a chapter on the elves of Middle-earth and their parallels with medieval nobility. Other chapters look at the history of bear-men and berserkers, show you all about the historical parallels to the armies massing for the final great battle, reveal the secrets of medieval kingship (and how Thorin misses the mark), even show how Gandalf is less like Merlin and more like Odin or maybe even Loki! These and many other chapters written by amazing scholars are waiting to be read. Purchase The Hobbit and History from many outlets:
At Amazon.com
At Chapters
At B&N
At Amazon.ca
At Amazon UK

Cover of Women During the English Reformations My chapter on Margaret Pole, “‘Rather an Strong and Constant Man’: Margaret Pole and the Problem of Women’s Independence” in Women During the English Reformations: Renegotiating Gender and Religious Identity edited by Julie A. Chappell and Kaley A. Kramer (Palgrave, 2014).

Purchase it at:

At B&N
At Chapters
At Amazon.com
At Amazon.ca
At Amazon UK
 
 
My Cover of The Ravenclaw Chronicles keynote address from the 2012 Ravenclaw Academic Conference, is in print as “The World Hidden in Muggle History: Witches, Wizards, and the Historical Clergy,” in The Ravenclaw Chronicles edited by Potterfest organizer, Dr. Corbin Fowler (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2014).

Purchase it at:

At Amazon.com
Not currently at B&N or Chapters
At Amazon.ca
At Amazon UK

“‘Part of the Rebel Alliance and a Traitor’: Women in War and Resistance” Star Wars and History cover (with Nancy R. Reagin) and “Teen Queen: Padmé Amidala and the Power of Royal Women” in Star Wars and History edited by Nancy R. Reagin and Janice Liedl (Wiley, 2012).

Purchase it at:

At Amazon.com
At B&N
At Amazon.ca
At Chapters
At Amazon UK

“‘Magic is Might’: How the Wizarding Government Gained Its Power” and “Witches vs. Women: What Muggles Could Learn from Wizarding History” in Harry Potter and History (Wiley, 2011).

Buy it:

At Amazon.com
At B&N
At Amazon.ca
At Chapters
At Amazon UK

“Carlisle Cullen and the Witch Hunts of Puritan London” in Twilight and History (Wiley, 2010).

Buy it:

At Amazon.com
At B&N
At Amazon.ca
At Chapters
At Amazon UK

Read The New Twihards at Inside Higher Ed about our volume & Twilight and Philosophy.

“The Battle for History in Battlestar Galactica” in Space and Time: Essays on Visions of History in Science Fiction and Fantasy Television (McFarland, 2010).

Buy it:

At Amazon.com
At B&N
At Amazon.ca
At Abebooks
At Amazon UK

6 responses to “About

  1. CK

    All of these essays look interesting and fabulous!

  2. Pingback: » TFN Interview: SW And History Co-Editor Janice Liedl shesintostarwars

  3. Pingback: TFN Interview: SW And History Co-Editor Janice Liedl

  4. Hello,
    I hope you read this! I’m an aspiring historian, finishing up my undergrad and beginning to prepare for graduate school, and I was wondering if you had any advice for me on how to get into “pop culture” history. That’s, ultimately, where I’d like to be, but it’s hard to find schools with professors that could work on such a discipline with me.

    • J Liedl

      It’s good to hear from an eager student. First off, good luck with your graduate school hunt. I always start by warning people that jobs are few in history these days. It’s tougher than ever! That said, grad school offers a chance to build skills such as communication, archival skills and more – these can be applied in public history venues or corporate positions as well as in academic work.

      You’ll not often find anyone who’s teaching graduate courses or supervising topics in “Pop Culture Topic & History” but you can find scholars who work with popular culture materials and methods or who are open to crossovers from their mainstream fields. Look for people who are publishing on such topics or in journals such as the journal of popular culture. Some scholars see popular culture work as a waste of time – they want their students to concentrate on the dissertation and academically admired publications only!

      Every historian needs to have a scholarly base from which they operate. That might be a good place to start. Are you interested in children’s literature or youth music as popular culture topics to study? Maybe the work of Arthur Conan Doyle or modern medievalism? Do you love the eighteenth century or thrill to the Russian Revolution as your topic of study?

      I’m not sure where you’re located geographically or what types of history you might feel most familiar with (medieval or modern? North American/ANZAC/European?) so I can’t advise particular programs but I have known people who’ve found good supervision in popular culture history at places such as York University in Ontario while Bowling Green State University has a well-respected Center for Popular Culture Studies which is interdisciplinary in nature.

      Feel free to send me an email at jliedl.ca@gmail.com if you want to talk more about the subject off the blog!

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